Thanksgiving Stories

Happy

Thanksgiving!

Share your story:

What your favorite story of Thanksgiving?

What memories do you have of this time of year?

What traditions do you have?

Who celebrates with you? 

What’s the menu?

Who are you missing most this year?

(Praying for those of you who are alone or missing loved ones this time of year!)

7 Measures of Personal Success

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1. Honoring and obeying God with my life.

2. Attempting to realize my full potential.

3. Truly being who I claim to be.

4. Being loved most by the people who know me best.

5. Getting up every time I fall.

6. Making life better for the people around me.

7. Ending at peace with God, my family, and friends.

What are yours?

Make Twinkies at Home

Even though I haven’t eaten a Twinkie in years…except for that deep fried one with ice cream and Hershey’s syrup…

(But what’s done in a small town Southern diner (never) stays in a small town Southern diner)

I’m gonna miss Twinkies. It almost seems as a part of culture as…well…moon pies.

(I don’t eat them anymore either, but I want to know they are there should I choose to have one.)

Anyway, I was glad someone shared on Twitter that the New York Times was in this. I tweeted that I guess we would have to make Twinkies at home. Someone shared an article with me. Apparently you can…try.

Here’s the recipe.

Who wants to go first?

Winning Battles…1 Day at a Time

The girl got on the machine next to me

There were lots of similar machines…she chose this one

In one glance I knew there was potential trouble

She wasn’t wearing much. What she was wearing fit rather nicely…tight if you catch my drift

She was very attractive

I had to use discipline to bounce my eyes

By the way, that kind of discipline starts early

It doesn’t begin in the moment

But, it took discipline

I knew she was there the entire time. I just chose not to look

In fact, instead, I chose to write this blog post

Reminds me though…Satan is not above tempting a pastor

Or you

(And, yes, pastors are human) 🙂

Satan has great abilities but, thankfully, he has limited powers over the believer

No temptation has overtaken you except what is common to humanity. God is faithful, and He will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able, but with the temptation He will also provide a way of escape so that you are able to bear it.” (1 Corinthians 10:13)

the One who is in you is greater than the one who is in the world.” (1 John 4:4)

I won the battle. That day. Actually God’s Spirit won. This time.

There will be other battles. Even before this day ends probably.

I must be prepared.

Let’s pray.

Happy Veterans Day: God Bless Our Veterans and Troops

Give us aid against the enemy, for the help of man is worthless. Psalm 60:11 NIV

I have never been to war. I have, however, had the experience of meeting some veterans of foreign war; my father and brother included. As a patriot, I have the utmost respect for our armed service personnel in my country. Growing up in a military town, I tear up at official military functions. God bless our men and women in uniform!

I recall someone who was wounded in action say to me once, that on the battlefield, when you face the enemy, there is no greater time when your dependence upon God is needed. The old saying goes, “There are no atheists in the foxhole.” I can only imagine the genuine fear that one must face when their life is in such danger.

I don’t know about you, but this world seems like a war zone sometimes. No, we don’t feel the danger that our military often do, but there are moments when we can feel the things important to us are in jeopardy. Times when the doctor gives a loved one unfavorable news. Times when the bank account doesn’t balance, because there is more outgoing than incoming. Times when children are challenging are parenting skills can handle. Times when there are decisions to make bigger than our ability to reason.

I don’t know about you, but the process of daily living often causes me to realize I have no strength on my own. I suspect that is how those in real war feel.

The Psalmist recognized that the help of man was really worthless. Certainly God gives us each other to help us along our way, but when the real problems of life come, only One can help us through. If you were in trouble, I would try to help you, but I can assure you, if the problem gets too big, I’m of no use!

It’s Veterans Day again. Time to remember and recognize those who serve so well, so brave, so unselfishly. I am reminded too that the One and Only God the Creator, the One who knows how to paint a sunset and send waves along the ocean surface, is the One who can ultimately fight the struggles we face in life. When life is at its worst (and its best) we need a Savior! Thank you for our veterans God. Keep our soldiers safe from our enemies. God protect our country.

Happy Veterans Day! God bless our troops. God bless us all!

Discarding the Truck: Guest Post

This is a guest post by Josh Riebock. Josh lives in Texas with his wife and dog. He’s the author of Heroes and Monsters and My Generation. He loves 80s music. He doesn’t think TV is evil. He once got a really bad tattoo and he sometimes tells the truth. You can visit him at www.joshriebock.com

Discarding the Truck

A little boy was in the backyard, playing with his brand new toy truck, when he heard his dad calling. Immediately, the boy ran into the house, looking through all the rooms for his dad. Eventually, he found him in the bedroom, sitting in a chair, reading the newspaper. The little boy ran to his dad, and said, “Dad! I was outside and I thought I heard you calling me. So I ran to you.”

Setting the newspaper aside, the dad lifted his son onto his lap. Then he looked into his son’s eyes, and slapped the little boy across the face.

“Son, you’re wrong. I wasn’t calling you. Next time you think you hear my voice, you better make sure that it’s me before you come running.”

In a nearby backyard, another little boy was playing with his brand new toy truck, when he heard his dad calling. Immediately, the boy ran into the house, looking through all the rooms for his dad. Eventually, he found him in the bedroom, sitting in a chair, reading the newspaper. The little boy ran to his dad, and said, “Dad! I was outside and I thought I heard you calling me. So I ran to you.”

Setting the newspaper aside, the dad lifted his son onto his lap, and smiled.

“Son, I wasn’t calling you in here. But the fact that you came running when you thought you heard my voice brings me so much joy.”

I find the idea of hearing and responding to God’s voice to be an incredibly fuzzy concept. It’s wonderful. It’s frustrating. It brings me comfort. It drives me mad. Sure, I believe God wants me to be able to recognize his voice, to respond to it. And I believe that as I grow closer to him I’ll become more familiar with what He sounds like, but what am I supposed to do along the way? How am I supposed to respond to a voice when I’m not sure if it’s God, or just some voice in my head? And how am I supposed to lead others through this fog?

The above story is about this very thing, and more specifically, about reconfiguring my understanding of who God is, what He values more, and what I, in turn, ought to value.

Like the second father, perhaps God takes greater joy in my desire to respond when I think I hear him calling, rather than my ability to hear him perfectly. Perhaps God wants me to go where I believe He’s leading—even if I’m uncertain that it’s him, even if I’m wrong altogether—and to lead others to do the same. Perhaps God wants me to long for intimacy with him over clarity from him. But for that to happen, I have to see God as the second father rather than the first. I have to believe that He is that second father. After all, it’s my fear of what will happen if I’m wrong that often keeps me from pursuing the voice of God. But if I were to believe in a loving father who takes great joy in my eagerness to run when I think I hear him calling, then perhaps I’d come running more often, and spend less time worrying about whether or not I’ve got flawless hearing.

 

What do you think? 

Election Results Prediction


 

Call me a prophet, but I have the results.

Here’s what you may not have known.

You’ve seen the commercials. You’ve seen the debates.

But it was really only a one candidate race all along.

And only one vote was cast.

Here’s my prophecy.

The votes are in and I’m happy to report.

Jesus wins!

He is Lord! He is King!

He has risen. He’s alive. He’s the Victor!

No need to stress. Don’t be worried. It’s all under control.

The election results are in and Jesus wins!

For the literal reader: Maybe there were three candidates if you count the Trinity separately. But really the three are one… (But that’s another post.)

What election did you think I was referring to? Is there one more important than this? 

Why most blogs never make it…

They don’t stand the test of time.

It takes months or years to build a strong, steady, daily audience.

The worst thing for your blogging may be the numbers you are monitoring. Stop it. Quit watching them.

Pick a subject you know and about which you are passionate. Write good posts. Engage with other blogs. Look for opportunities to promote your work. Then, ignore all the numbers and keep blogging. Be patient as your blog grows.

We miss a lot of great content, because you give up before we find it. If you have something that needs to be said, if you know a little about it, say it well, say it with passion, but keep saying it until we start to listen.

Any questions?

Social Media Changes Everything….

Okay, maybe not everything, but certainly many things.

The rules of the game are changing…

Thanks to social media.

As you may know, I recently transitioned from one church to another. The new church is more established. They have had 104 years to establish their systems and procedures. When it came to hiring a pastor…they had a predetermined system of how that was to be done.

The problem for me was when to alert my church of the possibility of a change. If I told them too early, and didn’t go, it could cripple my leadership. If I told them too late, or after they heard the news on the streets, I could injure people we love.

I was wise enough to discern that with social media, the chances of holding this information were almost impossible. I knew that as soon as either church knew the world would know.

The search team was awesome. They were willing to work with us as much as they could, but still, there was a scripted way the hiring of a new pastor is to occur.

I wanted to honor their structure, but more importantly, I didn’t want to hurt the church plant I love. It appeared the best thing for me to do was to resign my position at Grace before it was official that I was the new pastor of Immanuel.

As it turned out, when I did announce to Grace that I was leaving, it was on Facebook before the end of the first service.

Also, which couldn’t have been avoided either way, someone from Grace was sitting in the audience of Immanuel the Sunday I was announced there. They texted someone at Grace just before I made my announcement. It really is a small world and was a reminder how fast news can travel these days.

As I said, social media (and technology) changes everything.

It was a definite signal to me that we must rethink some of our rules and procedures when it comes to hiring staff members at our churches. Some of the bylaws we have in place, that script the way a person is hired, must be changed to compensate for the speed that information travels these days.

It was okay in my situation. God worked it for good and both churches were protected. I’m not sure it would work that well for everyone. I don’t have the answers, but I’m confident there must be better ways.

One thing I did initiate at Grace, before my departure, was a change in the bylaws that simply allows the elders in leadership at the time to script the way the search and approval process for a new pastor is handled. It could be that it’s unique to every new pastor, or at least that it’s unique to each time a pastor is hired.

Here at Immanuel I’ve asked the search team that worked with me to evaluate the system of calling a pastor. What changes are needed…in light of the changes in the way things are done now…in light of social media.

What do you think? How else is social media and technology changing ministry?

7 Tips to Acclimating to a New City

I recently moved to a new city. Lexington, Kentucky is a great place to live. I’ve yet to meet someone who doesn’t enjoy living here.

Along the process of adjusting to a new city, I discovered a few keys to acclimating quickly.

Here are 7 tips to acclimating to a new city:

Check out the local hamburger places – I figure if we can find a good hamburger…we won’t starve. Seriously, pick one of your favorite foods and check out all the options. For me, there are plenty of hamburger choices in Lexington. That’s made the transition much easier. I’ve tried many of them. I have a few more to go. (I’ve loved when someone tells me…”Don’t get the biggest one on the menu. You won’t be able to eat it all.” Really? So far, not true!)

Be a tourist – We have tried to find the places someone would go to if they were only in town for a few days. We’ve picked up the tourist brochures. These places will likely be what the town is known for and we want to identify with the city. I’ve also been listening to the stories and reading the history of the city. It’s been interesting a few times to remind the locals of things they’ve forgotten about Lexington, or to stir more conversation with trivia I’ve learned.

Buy a t-shirt – We wanted to find an identity with the community, so we bought some t-shirts specific to the area. In this case, I’m sporting a few UK logos too. If I’m going to live here, and I want to love living here, I want to love what the locals love. You don’t have to switch sports loyalties, but it will help acclimate if you can find some identity within the community.

Join a group that lets you meet people – I’m doing Leadership Lexington this next year. It’s a 9 month program that gives participants a comprehensive look at the possibilities and opportunities of the city. In addition to getting to know 42 local leaders, I get exposed to areas of the city it may take me years to discover otherwise.

Make a Gotta see/do/meet list – I’m keeping a list, and checking it twice. I can’t see everything in a week, maybe even in a year, but with a list I can slowly work my way through the key things I want to do and people I want to meet.

Avoid routines – I try to run different routes every day. I seldom drive the same way to get somewhere. I’m eating at different restaurants and ordering different meals. I want to experience as much uniqueness as I can.

Hide the GPS – Get lost. I’m purposefully trying to go places where I have to find my own way on my own. I’ve been confused a few times. That’s okay. It was by design. It’s helping me learn the city faster.

It’s quickly beginning to feel like home. Actually, sooner than I thought it would. I think part of that is that Cheryl and I have been intentional in trying to learn and love our new city. Obviously, however, some of you have moved far more times than I have.

How can you help me?

What tips do you have for acclimating to a new city quickly?